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Adaptive Education and Certification

Be Prepared for EVERY Student

Adaptive Events

Education Clinics & Workshops

Education Clinics:

Understanding & Addressing Behavior in Snowsports Lessons

Guests in snowsports lessons sometimes exhibit bewildering behavior. This three-hour webinar will examine common behaviors seen in adaptive and typical lessons, reasons why they may occur and strategies to proactively address guest needs to avoid behavior challenges during lessons.

Bi-Ski/Mono-Ski Prep Clinic

Designed to prepare you for the Adaptive Alpine Bi-Ski/Mono-Ski Module On-the-Hill Exam. This one-day clinic provides participants with feedback on their bi-ski and mono-ski teaching and equipment handling skills.

Fundamentals of Alpine and Adaptive Skiing

Seasoned pros or instructors new to adaptive skiing can find much to like about this engaging and active session. Concepts and hands-on activities converge, providing opportunities for attendees to discover the hows and whys of:

  • The Fundamentals of Alpine Skiing
  • Skier assessment
  • Adaptive equipment selection and use
  • Innovative teaching assists and methodologies
  • Techniques for empowering learner independence

This clinic helps attendees acquire the skills necessary to offer appropriate services to guests with special needs who visit their learning centers. With the combination of Alpine and Adaptive Alpine Skiing concepts, all instructors can learn the truth of the adage, “Skiing is skiing.”

Teaching our 3-Track, 4-Track, and Slider Students

This one-day clinic is for all ski instructors who want to know more about the options available for teaching Adapted Stand Skiers. Both equipment and teaching adaptations are covered in this hands-on, practical clinic. Instructors who are planning to take their Adapted 3-Track, 4-Track, Slider exam can gain valuable exam preparation information.

Online Webinars:

Adaptive Cognitive Prep Online Clinic

Online interactive web clinic consisting of weekly videoconferences for 1 – 1½ hours over four weeks. 6 hour credit.

In this clinic you learn:

  • Common cognitive and developmental disabilities you may encounter as an adaptive ski instructor.
  • Classes of medications commonly used by our guests with cognitive and developmental disabilities.
  • How to create a progressive lesson for our guests with cognitive and developmental disabilities.
  • Teaching models (such as Sensory Preferences, Teaching Styles, The Teaching Cycle and Multiple Intelligences) that may be used for instructing any guest.
  • How to incorporate Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs and Guest-Centered Teaching concepts into your lessons to make them effective and satisfying for all of your guests.

In each class, we discuss the skiing, teaching and technical skills that are evaluated against PSIA National Standards. While this clinic is designed as a preparatory clinic for those taking their Level 1 & 2 Cognitive/Visually Impaired Exam, anyone who wants to enhance their Cognitive lessons can benefit from this clinic.

Adaptive Movement Analysis Online Clinic

Online interactive web-based clinic meeting weekly for 1 – 1½ hours over four weeks.

Each class reviews skiing videos and discusses the skiing, teaching and technical skills that are evaluated against PSIA National Standards. Each week the clinic focuses on one Alpine Skiing discipline:

  • Alpine skiing
  • Cognitive/Visually Impaired skiing
  • 3 Track/4 Track/Slider skiing
  • Bi/Mono Skiing

Visually Impaired Online Clinic

Online Prep Clinic consisting of two 2-1/2-hour videoconferences, plus homework.

On successful completion of this clinic (and with additional studying and practice), you will be able to:

  • Describe how the eye works
  • Explain common visual assessment terms
  • Articulate some of the most common visual impairments
  • Describe commonly-prescribed classes of medications
  • Perform a guest assessment
  • Follow proper guest etiquette
  • Perform indoor guiding techniques
  • Explain on-hill guiding techniques

In each class, we discuss the skiing, teaching and technical skills that are evaluated against PSIA National Standards. While this clinic is designed as a preparatory clinic for those taking their Alpine Level 1 & 2 Cognitive/Visually Impaired Exam, anyone who wants to enhance their Visually Impaired lessons can benefit from the clinic.

Exam Descriptions

All of Central’s Adaptive Modules have an online written exam. The written exam must be completed prior to attending the on-snow portion of the exam. For general information on how to access the online written exam please see our LMS-Guide page.

Adaptive Alpine Workshop and Functional Skiing Assessment (AD 230)

Designed as the first step in the Adaptive Alpine certification process. The two day clinic reviews the skiing skills needed to give a safe and effective adaptive alpine lesson. Participants have their skiing, teaching and technical skills evaluated against PSIA-ASSI National Adaptive Alpine Standards and the PSIA National Adaptive Exam Supplement. Each participant receives a written evaluation at the end of the weekend.

The Functional Skiing Assessment will be scored at:  Below Level I, Level I or Level II proficiency. Participant must score at least Level I in the Functional Skiing Assessment in order to participate in any of the Adaptive Alpine Exam Modules.

For more information please see: PSIA NATIONAL ADAPTIVE ALPINE STANDARDS and PSIA NATIONAL ADAPTIVE ALPINE EXAM SUPPLEMENT: https://www.thesnowpros.org/certification/national-certification-standards/


ALPINE BI-SKI/MONO-SKI MODULES:

Alpine Bi-Ski/Mono-Ski Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Exam Module:

What: The Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module is designed as the segment to assess an instructor’s assisting, fit-up and tethering skills, as well as their knowledge of how these skills are best used in an adaptive lesson for a student in a bi-ski or mono-ski.

The Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module may be passed at a Level 1 or Level 2 competency. This however, does not indicate Adaptive Level 2 certification. Please see the PSIA-AASI-C Adaptive Alpine Pathway to Certification for more information.

The complete Adaptive Alpine Bi-Ski and Mono-Ski certification consists of passing: (1) Alpine Level 1 or 2 certification, along with the specified Adaptive maneuvers, (2) Online Written Exam, (3) Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module, and (4) Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module.

Note: In 2020-2021 all Adaptive Alpine Level 1 & 2 Modules are conducted in a hybrid online process.

Why: The Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module gives the candidate the opportunity to demonstrate their professional knowledge, as well as their “on- hill” technical skills relating specifically to students skiing in a bi-ski or mono-ski


Pre-Requisites:

  • Alpine Bi-Ski/Mono-Ski Exam Module Workbook (PDF): Bi-Ski_Mono-Ski_Level_1&2_Workbook-12-16-16
    It is highly encouraged, but not required, that all candidates complete the Bi-
    Ski/Mono-Ski Exam Workbook prior to taking the online written exam, as well
    as the Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module and the
    Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module.
  • Alpine Bi-Ski/Mono-Ski Written Exam:
    Prior to registering for the Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module and the Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module, the candidate must pass Alpine Level 1 or 2 certification, along with the specified Adaptive maneuvers and the online written exam. To take your written exam, please click he re.: https://lms.thesnowpros.org/  
  • Candidates who are successful at their Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module and Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment
    Module retain the modular pass so long as they remain current in dues and education.
  • The Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module and the Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module may be taken in any order and repeated, if necessary. All modules must be passed for certification. (If you pass only one module, you do not need to retake it in future attempts.)

How: The assessment consists of an individual 30-minute online assessment with a member of the PSIA-AASI-C Adaptive Alpine staff. The candidate shares their computer screen and presents previously recorded demonstrations and presentations (no need to upload them to another site). The examiner follows up with probing questions to determine the depth of the candidate’s knowledge.

**Please note that for some of the videos, the examiner may ask the candidate to fast-forward during certain portions.
The videos must be taken in the season in which the candidate is being assessed. The demonstration and presentation video must include the following. Regardless of the order in which the videos were taken, they must be presented in this order:

  • Tether a bi-skier with fixed riggers (may be an actual person or a dummy/sandbag). Video must show the candidate start from a stopped position, make a minimum of six turns, then come to a controlled stop with proper tether wrap/unwrap.
  • Tether a bi-skier with hand-held riggers. Video must show the candidate start from a stopped position, make a minimum of six turns, then come to a controlled stop with proper tether wrap/unwrap.
  • Perform an emergency stop while tethering a bi-ski, once in each direction. The candidate must engage in a short series of turns before making each emergency stop.
  • Demonstrate how a fallen sit-skier can get up from a fall. The candidate may do this in whatever creative means desired. Include how to re-adjust the ski once you are up, to regain appropriate position for a centered/athletic stance. Video time limit: 60 seconds.
  • Demonstrate loading a bi-ski on a chairlift. May be done with a live person or dummy/sandbag in the bi-ski. The video must include clipping in the retention strap.
  • Demonstrate unloading a bi-ski from a chairlift. May be done with a live person or dummy/sandbag in the bi-ski. The video must include clipping out the retention strap (unload).
  • Demonstrate the basic use of outriggers. The candidate may do this in whatever creative means desired. However the demonstration is done, the candidate must show beginning (synchronous) outrigger movement and intermediate (asynchronous) outrigger movement. The candidate must also demonstrate how outrigger position changes based on the size of the turn.
  • Perform a sit-ski assessment and fit-up, including a dowel test and outrigger sizing. Maximum video length: 12 minutes. 
  • You must follow all requirements and guidelines for recording videos.  Read the “Video Requirements for Adaptive Alpine Assessment” document linked in the Education Resources section below.

Alpine Bi-Ski/Mono-Ski Teaching and Movement Analysis Exam Module:

What: The Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module is designed as the segment to assess an instructor’s teaching and movement analysis skills in an adaptive lesson for a student skiing in a bi-ski or mono-ski.

Candidates present a pre-recorded lesson, from levels 2-6 (i.e., no never-evers) with an adaptive student skiing in a mono-ski. When possible, a brief video of the student skiing prior to the lesson is also included. Through a series of probing questions, the examiner determines the candidate’s movement analysis and teaching skills. The Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module may be passed at a Level 1 or Level 2 competency. This however, does not indicate Adaptive Level 2 certification. Please see the PSIA-AASI-C Adaptive Alpine Pathway to Certification for more information.

The complete Adaptive Alpine Bi-Ski and Mono-Ski certification consists of passing: (1) Alpine Level 1 or 2 certification, along with the specified Adaptive maneuvers, (2) Online Written Exam, (3) Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module, and (4) Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module.

Note: In 2020-2021 all Adaptive Alpine Level 1; 2 Modules are conducted in a hybrid online process.


Why: Effective teaching and movement analysis skills elevate any snowsports lesson. The ability to adapt the five fundamentals of skiing and your own teaching
skills to the cognitive, affective and physical levels of an adaptive student is critical for a successful adaptive lesson.


How: The assessment consists of an individual 45-minute online assessment with a member of the PSIA-AASI-C Adaptive Alpine staff. The candidate shares their computer screen and presents a pre-recorded lesson, either with an actual adaptive student in a mono-ski or another person who is skiing in a mono-ski.

Whenever possible, please include a brief video of the student prior to the presented lesson, so the candidate can be evaluated on the appropriateness and effectiveness of the lesson plan. The examiner follows up with probing questions to determine the depth of the candidate’s knowledge. Please note that for some of the videos, the examiner may ask the candidate to fast-forward during certain portions.


The candidate’s ability to observe the student, evaluate and describe their application of the Five Fundamentals of Alpine Skiing and Skill Blend, and prescribe suitable corrections to their movements will be assessed relative to the PSIA-AASI
National Standards for Adaptive Alpine Level 1 and 2.

A few requirements for this video:

  • Your video must be contiguous (you may edit out chair rides, but a single run is recommended).
  • The image should be close and clear, preferably filmed by a 3rd party. Videos that are not clear, sufficiently close (i.e. subjects are less than 1/4 of the frame) may be rejected without prejudice.
  • Audio should be intelligible, although wind noise is to be expected.
  • When you present your lesson online, you will introduce the video, play the video, and answer questions about the lesson. Totally allotted time may not exceed 45 minutes.
  • You must follow all requirements and guidelines for recording videos.  Read the “Video Requirements for Adaptive Alpine Assessment” document linked in the Education Resources section below.

COGNITIVE/VISUALLY IMPAIRED DIAGNOSES MODULES, ALPINE LEVEL 1 & 2:

Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Exam Module:

What: The Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module is designed as the segment to assess an instructor’s guiding, assisting, and tethering skills, as well as their knowledge of how these skills are best used in an adaptive lesson for a student with a cognitive or visual diagnosis.

The Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module may be passed at a Level 1 or Level 2 competency. This does not, however, indicate Adaptive Level 2 certification. Please see the PSIA-AASI-C Adaptive Alpine Pathway to Certification below for more information.

The complete Adaptive Alpine Cognitive and Visual Diagnoses certification consists of passing: (1) Alpine Level 1 or 2 certification, along with the specified Adaptive maneuvers, (2) Online Written Exam, (3) Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module, and (4) Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module.

Note: In 2020-2021 all Adaptive Alpine Level 1 & 2 Modules are conducted in a hybrid online process.

Why: The Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module gives the candidate the opportunity to demonstrate their professional knowledge, as well as their “on- hill” technical skills relating specifically to students with cognitive and visual diagnoses.

Pre-Requisites:

  • Cognitive Disabilities/Visual Impairment Workbook–Cog_VI_Level_1&2_Workbook-12-5-17 (PDF):
    It is highly encouraged, but not required, that all candidates complete the Cognitive and Visual Diagnoses workbook prior to taking the online written exam, as well as the Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module and the Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module.
  • Alpine Cognitive/Visual Disabilities Written Exam: Prior to registering for the Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment
    Module and the Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module, the candidate must pass Alpine Level 1 or 2 certification, along with the specified Adaptive maneuvers and the online written exam. To take your written exam, please click here: https://lms.thesnowpros.org/
  • Candidates who are successful at their Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module and Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module retain the modular pass so long as they remain current in dues and education.
  • The Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module and the Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module may be taken in any order and repeated, if necessary. All modules must be passed for certification. (If you pass only one module, you do not need to retake it in future attempts.) 

 How:  Fulfill all pre-requisites above and then register for the exam module. The assessment consists of an individual 30-minute online assessment with a member of the PSIA-AASI-C Adaptive Alpine staff. The candidate shares their computer screen and presents previously recorded demonstrations and presentations (no need to upload them to another site). The examiner follows up with probing questions to determine the depth of the candidate’s knowledge. Please note that for some of the videos, the examiner may ask the candidate to fast-forward during certain portions.  The videos must be taken in the season in which the candidate is being assessed. The demonstration and presentation video must include the following list of tasks. Regardless of the order in which the videos were taken, they must be presented in this order:

  • Demonstrate a flat-terrain kinesthetic guide (your choice of technique) indoors or outdoors, but not on the slope.
  • Demonstrate how to do a visual assessment for a student who has a visual impairment. Must include assessment of visual acuity, visual field, and color vision deficiency. Remember that you can interact with your “student” to do the assessment.
  • Demonstrate the use of the clock system to guide a student from a stopped position to a first turn.
  • Demonstrate a visual guide, with a minimum of six turns and a stop. In the video, identify the visual diagnosis of your “student.”
  • Demonstrate an audible guide, with a minimum of six turns and a stop.
  • Demonstrate a kinesthetic guide, with a minimum of six turns and a stop.
  • Demonstrate a verbal guide, with a minimum of six turns and a stop.
  • Demonstrate a two-point hold, with a minimum of six turns and a stop.
  • Demonstrate a tip-hold, with a minimum of six turns and a stop.
  • Demonstrate stand-up tethering, with a minimum of six turns and a stop. The tether must be attached to the skis with a tip retention device. No boot tethering is allowed. The video must show the candidate start from a stopped position, make a minimum of six turns, then come to a controlled stop with proper tether management.
  • Demonstrate a side-by-side bamboo pole assist, with a minimum of six turns and a stop. 
  • Demonstrate a chairlift load of a stand-up student with a bamboo pole. 
  • Demonstrate a chairlift unload of a stand-up student with a bamboo pole.
  • Demonstrate a chairlift load of a stand-up student who is tethered. The tether must be attached to the skis with a tip retention device. No boot tethering is allowed.
  • Demonstrate a chairlift unload of a stand-up student who is tethered. The tether must be attached to the skis with a tip retention device. No boot tethering is allowed.
  • Give a presentation explaining the use of the following categories of on-ski appliances: (1) rigid tip retention devices, (2) semi-rigid (bungee and pipe) tip retention devices, (3) non-rigid (bungee cord) tip retention devices, (4) spacer/spreader bar, (5) bungee at heel, (6) tethers. Your presentation should include safety considerations and appropriateness of each category for typical students. Maximum length of video for all six categories: three minutes.
  • Give a presentation explaining the use of the following learning/communication pieces of equipment: (1) bamboo pole, (2) Hula Hoop ® /Ski-Pal ® , (3) augmentative communication picture cards. Succinctly explain the fundamental skiing and/or communication skills each piece of equipment addresses to compensate for a deficit/challenge. Maximum video length for all three categories of equipment: two minutes. 
  • You must follow all requirements and guidelines for recording videos.  Read the “Video Requirements for Adaptive Alpine Assessment” document linked in the Education Resources section below.

Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module Exam Module:

What: The Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module is designed as the segment to assess an instructor’s teaching and movement analysis skills in an adaptive lesson for a student with a cognitive or visual diagnosis.

Candidates present a pre-recorded lesson, from levels 2-6 (i.e., no never-evers) with an adaptive student with a cognitive diagnosis. When possible, a brief video of the student skiing prior to the lesson is also included. Through a series of probing questions, the examiner determines the candidate’s movement analysis and teaching skills.

The Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module may be passed at a Level 1 or Level 2 competency. This however, does not indicate Adaptive Level 2 certification. Please see the PSIA-AASI-C Adaptive Alpine Pathway to Certification below for more information.

The complete Adaptive Alpine Cognitive and Visual Diagnoses certification consists of passing: (1) Alpine Level 1 or 2 certification, along with the specified Adaptive maneuvers, (2) Online Written Exam, (3) Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module, and (4) Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module.

Note: In 2020-2021 all Adaptive Alpine Level 1 & 2 Modules are conducted in a hybrid online process.

Why: Effective teaching and movement analysis skills elevate any snowsports lesson. The ability to adapt the five fundamentals of skiing and your own teaching skills to the cognitive, affective and physical levels of an adaptive student is critical for a successful adaptive lesson.

How: The assessment consists of an individual 45-minute online assessment with a member of the PSIA-AASI-C Adaptive Alpine staff. The candidate shares their computer screen and presents a pre-recorded lesson, either with an actual adaptive student with a cognitive diagnosis or another person who is presenting themselves, for the purposes of the assessment, as an adaptive student with a cognitive diagnosis.* Whenever possible, please include a brief video of the student prior to the presented lesson, so the candidate can be evaluated on the appropriateness and effectiveness of the lesson plan. The examiner follows up with probing questions to determine the depth of the candidate’s knowledge. Please note that for some of the videos, the examiner may ask the candidate to fast-forward during certain portions.

* If the teaching video is not done with an actual adaptive student with a cognitive diagnosis, another person may present themselves, for the purposes of the assessment, as an adaptive student with a cognitive diagnosis. Doing so may include mimicking body movements, speech patterns, word choices, and comprehension level of a student with a cognitive diagnosis. While this is an important part of the assessment process, please do so with respect and grace. This mimicking should never be done in such a way that belittles or insults any person with a cognitive diagnosis. The candidate’s ability to observe the student, evaluate and describe their application of the Five Fundamentals of Alpine Skiing and Skill Blend, and prescribe suitable corrections to their movements will be assessed relative to the PSIA-AASI National Standards for Adaptive Alpine Level 1 and 2.

A few requirements for this video:

  • Your video must be contiguous (you may edit out chair rides, but a single run is recommended).
  • The image should be close and clear, preferably filmed by a 3rd party. Videos that are not clear, sufficiently close (i.e. subjects are less than 1/4 of the frame) may be rejected without prejudice.
  • Audio should be intelligible, although wind noise is to be expected. 
  • When you present your lesson online, you will introduce the video, play the video, and answer questions about the lesson. Totally allotted time may not exceed 45 minutes.
  • You must follow all requirements and guidelines for recording videos.  Read the “Video Requirements for Adaptive Alpine Assessment” document linked in the Education Resources section below.

3-TRACK/4-TRACK MODULES:

Alpine 3-Track/4-Track Professional Knowledge and Skills Assessment Exam Module:

What: The Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module is designed as the segment to assess an instructor’s assisting, equipment setup, and tethering skills, as well as their knowledge of how these skills are best used in an adaptive lesson for a student who 3-tracks 4-tracks, or skis with a slider.

The Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module may be passed at a Level 1 or Level 2 competency. This however, does not indicate Adaptive Level 2 certification. Please see the PSIA-AASI-C Adaptive Alpine Pathway to Certification for more information.

The complete Adaptive Alpine Bi-Ski and Mono-Ski certification consists of passing: (1) Alpine Level 1 or 2 certification, along with the specified Adaptive maneuvers, (2) Online Written Exam, (3) Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module, and (4) Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module.

In Note: 2020-2021 all Adaptive Alpine Level 1 & 2 Modules are conducted in a hybrid online process.

Why: The Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module gives the candidate the opportunity to demonstrate their professional knowledge, as well as their “on- hill” technical skills relating specifically to students skiing in a bi-ski or mono-ski 

Pre-Requisites:

  • 3-Track/4-Track Workbook —3-Track_4-Track_Slider_Level_1&2_Workbook-12-5-17 (PDF):
    Study guide for both the written exam and On-the-Hill exam. It is highly encouraged, but not required, that all candidates complete the Bi- Ski/Mono-Ski Exam Workbook prior to taking the online written exam, as well as the Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module and the Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module.
  • 3-Track/4-Track Written Exam:
    Prior to registering for the Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module and the Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module, the candidate must pass Alpine Level 1 or 2 certification, along with the specified Adaptive maneuvers and the online written exam. The Written Exam is taken online . It is an open-book exam that evaluates the teaching, technical and disability knowledge of the participant specific to lessons for 3-track, 4-track. A passing score on the Written exam is required before a participant may take the On-the Hill Exam module. Take it online here: https://lms.thesnowpros.org/
  • Candidates who are successful at their Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module and Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module retain the modular pass so long as they remain current in dues and education.
  • The Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module and the Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module may be taken in any order and repeated, if necessary. All modules must be passed for certification. (If you pass only one module, you do not need to retake it in future attempts.) 

How: The assessment consists of an individual 30-minute online assessment with a member of the PSIA-AASI-C Adaptive Alpine staff. The candidate shares their computer screen and presents previously recorded demonstrations and presentations (no need to upload them to another site). The examiner follows up with probing questions to determine the depth of the candidate’s knowledge. Please note that for some of the videos, the examiner may ask the candidate to fast-forward during certain portions.

The videos must be taken in the season in which the candidate is being assessed. Videos must contain the following and regardless of the order in which the videos were taken, must be presented in this order:

  • Four-track ski, with a minimum of six turns and a stop. Repeat the entire process with a stop in the opposite direction.
  • Three-track ski on the left leg, with a minimum of six turns and a stop. Repeat the entire process with a stop in the opposite direction.
  • Three-track ski on the right leg, with a minimum of six turns and a stop. Repeat the entire process with a stop in the opposite direction.
  • Three-track ski through green/blue bumps, with a minimum of six turns and a stop. Repeat the entire process with a stop in the opposite direction.
  • Tether a skier in a slider. Video must show the candidate start from a stopped position, make a minimum of six turns, then come to a controlled stop with proper tether wrap/unwrap.
  • Demonstrate how to get up from a fall as a three-tracker. The candidate may do this in whatever creative means desired. Video time limit: 60 seconds.
  • Demonstrate how to get in and out of skis as a three-tracker. The demonstration must be done on both the left and right leg.
  • Demonstrate getting on a chairlift as a three-tracker. Video must include safe and effective use of outriggers, including crutch and ski positions.
  • Demonstrate getting off a chairlift as a three-tracker. Video must include safe and effective use of outriggers, including crutch and ski positions.
  • Demonstrate slider set-up. Demonstration must include the choice of skis; effective positioning of the skis; and variations in the positioning of the slider components to create the most effective setup for a given student. Maximum video length: two minutes. 
  • You must follow all requirements and guidelines for recording videos.  Read the “Video Requirements for Adaptive Alpine Assessment” document linked in the Education Resources section below.

Alpine 3-Track/4-Track Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Exam Module:

What: The Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module is designed as the segment to assess an instructor’s teaching and movement analysis skills in an adaptive lesson for a student skiing as a three-tracker, four-tracker, or with a slider.

Candidates present a pre-recorded lesson, from levels 2-6 (i.e., no never-evers) with an adaptive student skiing as a three-tracker or a four-tracker. When possible, a brief video of the student skiing prior to the lesson is also included. Through a series of probing questions, the examiner determines the candidate’s movement analysis and teaching skills.

The Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module may be passed at a Level 1 or Level 2 competency. This however, does not indicate Adaptive Level 2 certification. Please see the PSIA-AASI-C Adaptive Alpine Pathway to Certification for more information.

The complete Adaptive Alpine Three-Track/Four-Track/Slider certification consists of passing: (1) Alpine Level 1 or 2 certification, along with the specified Adaptive maneuvers, (2) Online Written Exam, (3) Teaching and Movement Analysis Assessment Module, and (4) Professional Knowledge and Skill Assessment Module.

Note: In 2020-2021 all Adaptive Alpine Level 1 & 2 Modules are conducted in a hybrid online process.

Why: Effective teaching and movement analysis skills elevate any snowsports lesson. The ability to adapt the five fundamentals of skiing and your own teaching skills to the cognitive, affective and physical levels of an adaptive student is critical for a successful adaptive lesson.

How: The assessment consists of an individual 45-minute online assessment with a member of the PSIA-AASI-C Adaptive Alpine staff. The candidate shares their computer screen and presents a pre-recorded lesson, either with an actual adaptive student skiing as a three-tracker or four-tracker or another person who is skiing in a three-tracker or four-tracker. Whenever possible, please include a brief video of the student prior to the presented lesson, so the candidate can be evaluated on the appropriateness and effectiveness of the lesson plan.

The examiner follows up with probing questions to determine the depth of the candidate’s knowledge. Please note that for some of the videos, the examiner may ask the candidate to fast-forward during certain portions.

The candidate’s ability to observe the student, evaluate and describe their application of the Five Fundamentals of Alpine Skiing and Skill Blend, and prescribe suitable corrections to their movements will be assessed relative to the PSIA-AASI National Standards for Adaptive Alpine Level 1 and 2.

A few requirements for this video:

  • Your video must be contiguous (you may edit out chair rides, but a single run is recommended). 
  • The image should be close and clear, preferably filmed by a 3rd party. Videos that are not clear, nor sufficiently close (i.e. subjects are less than 1/4 of the frame), may be rejected without prejudice. 
  • Audio should be intelligible, although wind noise is to be expected. 
  • When you present your lesson online, you will introduce the video, play the video, and answer questions about the lesson. Totally allotted time may not exceed 45 minutes.
  • You must follow all requirements and guidelines for recording videos.  Read the “Video Requirements for Adaptive Alpine Assessment” document linked in the Education Resources section below.

Certification Pathway Requirements

Join as a Registered Member of Central Division – Join Now!

  1. Pay Central Division and National Dues

**Note: Maintain active certification status by paying annual dues and obtaining a minimum of 6 CEU’s every membership year (July 1 – June 30.) Any CEU hours greater than 6 obtained in a membership year will be applied towards the CEU requirement for the following membership year only.

Adaptive Level 1

Requirements:

  1. 1. Pay Central Division and National Dues
  2. 2. Have read and understood the National Standards for Adaptive Alpine Level 1 Certification and the Exam Supplements
  3. 3. Have completed any 1 of the following:
    –Adaptive Alpine Workshop & Functional Skiing Assessment – earning at least a level 1 proficiency.
    OR
    –Alpine Level II Certification or Higher, or have passed the Alpine Level II Skiing Module 
    –Alpine Level I Certification with the additional Adaptive Elements.
  4. 4. Complete and pass the Adaptive Online Written Exam prior to registering for any of the exam modules.
    1. Additional Resources on how to access the E-Learning Course on the Learning Management System (LMS) can be found here.
  5. 5. Take and pass 1 of 3 of the Adaptive Module Exams (3-Track/4-Track, Bi-Ski/Mono-Ski, Cog/VI)
    • (See Exam Descriptions above for more detailed information for required exam modules in each track.)

Adaptive Level 2

Requirements:

  1. 1. Pay Central Division and National Dues
  2. 2. Have read and understood the National Standards for Adaptive Alpine Level 2 Certification and the Exam Supplements
  3. 3. Have completed any 1 of the following:
    –Adaptive Alpine Workshop & Functional Skiing Assessment – With a Level 2 proficiency score ( If the candidate has already earned a level 2 proficiency for the Adaptive Alpine Workshop & Functional Skiing Assessment then they do not need to retake the course )
    OR
    –Alpine Level II Certification or Higher, or have passed the Alpine Level II Skiing Module
  4. 4. Complete and pass the Adaptive Online Written Exam prior to registering for the On-Snow portion of the exam.
    • Additional Resources on how to access the E-Learning Course on the Learning Management System (LMS) can be found here.
  5. 5. Complete all 3 tracks of the Adaptive Module Exams*  (3-Track/4-Track, Bi-Ski/Mono-Ski, Cog/VI)
    (The candidate will not need to retake the module exams that they have passed previously unless they received a level 1 proficiency in the module they would like to specialize in. In this case, a level 2 proficiency must be attained for that module.)
    *In order to receive Adaptive Level 2 Certification at least one of the Adaptive Module Exams must be completed with a level 2 proficiency. If either the Functional Skiing Assessment or one of their Module Exams have not been passed at Level 2 proficiency previously, the candidate must retake an individual exam to achieve Level 2.)

    • (See Exam Descriptions above for more detailed information for required exam modules in each track.)

Pathway to Education Staff

The Pathway to Education Staff Portal describes the various ways a Central Division Level 3 Instructor can work his or her way towards becoming a member of the Central Division Education Staff as a Staff Member or as an Examiner.

Prerequisites:
  1. 1. Alpine Level 3 Certified
  2. 2. Have an active trainer role at home resort ski school

Open to anyone meeting the prerequisites.

Education Staff Tryout Process:
  1. 1. Submit a written essay (required)
  2. 2. Submit a Video Portfolio of free-skiing and benchmarks (required)
  3. 3. After vetting/review, receive an invitation to the on-snow 2-day tryout based on materials submitted. (no fee)
  4. 4. Prepare a 5-minute indoor presentation.
  5. 5. Participate in both days of the tryouts.
  6. 6. Upon successful tryout, to be hired immediately.
Requirements:
  1. 1. High degree of professionalism
  2. 2. Outstanding communication skills
  3. 3. Self-starter re: continued professional development in skiing and teaching abilities
  4. 4. Commitment to work when/as needed
  5. 5. Ongoing contributor to the PSIA-AASI Knowledge Base

For more information, contact a Central Discipline Administrator.

Education Resources

Adaptive Certification

Candidates for Adaptive Certification will want to become thoroughly familiar with the 2014 National Standards and the Exam Supplements.

© Professional Ski instructors of America - American Association of Snowboard Instructors - Central Division